Archive for the ‘Microsoft’ Category

I recently started in the Fishers Youth Mentoring Initiative, and my mentee is a young man in junior high who really likes lizards. He showed me photos of them on his iPad, photos of his pet lizard, and informed me of many lizard facts. He’s also a talented sketch artist – showcasing many drawings of Pokemon, lizards and more. Oh, yeah, he’s also into computers and loves his iPad.

Part of the mentoring program is to help with school, being there as they adjust to growing up, and both respecting and encouraging their interests.

It just so happens that he had a science project coming up. He wasn’t sure what to write about. His pet lizard recently had an attitude shift, and he figured it was because it wasn’t getting as much food week over week. Changing that, he realized its attitude changed. So, he wanted to cover that somehow.

Seeing his interest in lizards, drawing, and computers I asked if we could combine them. I suggested we build an app, a “Reptile Tracker,” that would help us track reptiles, teach others about them, and show them drawings he did. He loved the idea.

Planning

We only get to meet for 30 minutes each week. So, I gave him some homework. Next time we meet, “show me what the app would look like.” He gleefully agreed.

One week later, he proudly showed me his vision for the app:

Reptile Tracker

I said “Very cool.” I’m now convinced “he’s in” on the project, and taking it seriously.

I was also surprised to learn that my expectations of “show me what it would look like” were different from what I received from someone both much younger than I and with a different world view. To him, software may simply be visualized as an icon. In my world, it’s mockups and napkin sketches. It definitely made me think about others’ perceptions!

True to software engineer and sort-of project manager form, I explained our next step was to figure out what the app would do. So, here’s our plan:

  1. Identify if there are reptiles in the photo.
  2. Tell them if it’s safe to pick it up, if it’s venomous, and so forth.
  3. Get one point for every reptile found. We’ll only support Lizards, Snakes, and Turtles in the first version.

Alright, time for the next assignment. My homework was to figure out how to do it. His homework was to draw up the Lizard, Snake, and Turtle that will be shown in the app.

Challenge accepted!

I quickly determined a couple key design and development points:

  • The icon he drew is great, but looks like a drawing on the screen. I think I’ll need to ask him to draw them on my Surface Book, so they have the right look. Looks like an opportunity for him to try Fresh Paint on my Surface Book.
  • Azure Cognitive Services, specifically their Computer Vision solution (API), will work for this task. I found a great article on the Xamarin blog by Mike James. I had to update it a bit for this article, as the calls and packages are a bit different two years later, but it definitely pointed me in the right direction.

Writing the Code

The weekend came, and I finally had time. I had been thinking about the app the remainder of the week. I woke up early Saturday and drew up a sketch of the tracking page, then went back to sleep. Later, when it was time to start the day, I headed over to Starbucks…

20181105_083756

I broke out my shiny new MacBook Pro and spun up Visual Studio Mac. Xamarin Forms was the perfect candidate for this project – cross platform, baby! I started a new Tabbed Page project, brought over some code for taking photos with the Xam.Plugin.Media plugin and resizing them, and the beta Xamarin.Essentials plugin for eventual geolocation and settings support. Hey, it’s only the first week Smile

Side Note: Normally I would use my Surface Book. This was a chance for me to seriously play with MFractor for the first time. Yay, even more learning this weekend!

Now that I had the basics in there, I created the interface for the Image Recognition Service. I wanted to be able to swap it out later if Azure didn’t cut it, so Dependency Service to the rescue! Here’s the interface:

using System.IO;
using System.Threading.Tasks;
using Microsoft.Azure.CognitiveServices.Vision.ComputerVision.Models;
 
namespace ReptileTracker.Services
{
     public interface IImageRecognitionService
     {
         string ApiKey { get; set; }
         Task<ImageAnalysis> AnalyzeImage(Stream imageStream);
     }
}

Now it was time to check out Mike’s article. It made sense, and was close to what I wanted. However, the packages he referenced were for Microsoft’s Project Oxford. In 2018, those capabilities have been rolled into Azure as Azure Cognitive Services. Once I found the updated NuGet package – Microsoft.Azure.CognitiveServices.Vision.ComputerVision – and made some code tweaks, I ended up with working code.

A few developer notes for those playing with Azure Cognitive Services:

  • Hold on to that API key, you’ll need it
  • Pay close attention to the Endpoint on the Overview page – you must provide it, otherwise you’ll get a 403 Forbidden

image

And here’s the implementation. Note the implementation must have a parameter-less constructor, otherwise Dependency Service won’t resolve it.

using Microsoft.Azure.CognitiveServices.Vision.ComputerVision;
using Microsoft.Azure.CognitiveServices.Vision.ComputerVision.Models;
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.IO;
using System.Threading.Tasks;
using ReptileTracker.Services;
using Xamarin.Forms;
 
[assembly: Dependency(typeof(ImageRecognitionService))]
namespace ReptileTracker.Services
{
    public class ImageRecognitionService : IImageRecognitionService
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// The Azure Cognitive Services Computer Vision API key.
        /// </summary>
        public string ApiKey { get; set; }
 
        /// <summary>
        /// Parameterless constructor so Dependency Service can create an instance.
        /// </summary>
        public ImageRecognitionService()
        {
 
        }
 
        /// <summary>
        /// Initializes a new instance of the <see cref="T:ReptileTracker.Services.ImageRecognitionService"/> class.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="apiKey">API key.</param>
        public ImageRecognitionService(string apiKey)
        {
 
            ApiKey = apiKey;
        }
 
        /// <summary>
        /// Analyzes the image.
        /// </summary>
        /// <returns>The image.</returns>
        /// <param name="imageStream">Image stream.</param>
        public async Task<ImageAnalysis> AnalyzeImage(Stream imageStream)
        {
            const string funcName = nameof(AnalyzeImage);
 
            if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(ApiKey))
            {
                throw new ArgumentException("API Key must be provided.");
            }
 
            var features = new List<VisualFeatureTypes> {
                VisualFeatureTypes.Categories,
                VisualFeatureTypes.Description,
                VisualFeatureTypes.Faces,
                VisualFeatureTypes.ImageType,
                VisualFeatureTypes.Tags
            };
 
            var credentials = new ApiKeyServiceClientCredentials(ApiKey);
            var handler = new System.Net.Http.DelegatingHandler[] { };
            using (var visionClient = new ComputerVisionClient(credentials, handler))
            {
                try
                {
                    imageStream.Position = 0;
                    visionClient.Endpoint = "https://eastus.api.cognitive.microsoft.com/";
                    var result = await visionClient.AnalyzeImageInStreamAsync(imageStream, features);
                    return result;
                }
                catch (Exception ex)
                {
                    Debug.WriteLine($"{funcName}: {ex.GetBaseException().Message}");
                    return null;
                }
            }
        }
 
    }
}

And here’s how I referenced it from my content page:

pleaseWait.IsVisible = true;
pleaseWait.IsRunning = true;
var imageRecognizer = DependencyService.Get<IImageRecognitionService>();
imageRecognizer.ApiKey = AppSettings.ApiKey_Azure_ImageRecognitionService;
var details = await imageRecognizer.AnalyzeImage(new MemoryStream(ReptilePhotoBytes));
pleaseWait.IsRunning = false;
pleaseWait.IsVisible = false;

var tagsReturned = details?.Tags != null 
                   && details?.Description?.Captions != null 
                   && details.Tags.Any() 
                   && details.Description.Captions.Any();

lblTags.IsVisible = true; 
lblDescription.IsVisible = true; 

// Determine if reptiles were found. 
var reptilesToDetect = AppResources.DetectionTags.Split(','); 
var reptilesFound = details.Tags.Any(t => reptilesToDetect.Contains(t.Name.ToLower()));  

// Show animations and graphics to make things look cool, even though we already have plenty of info. 
await RotateImageAndShowSuccess(reptilesFound, "lizard", details, imgLizard);
await RotateImageAndShowSuccess(reptilesFound, "turtle", details, imgTurtle);
await RotateImageAndShowSuccess(reptilesFound, "snake", details, imgSnake);
await RotateImageAndShowSuccess(reptilesFound, "question", details, imgQuestion);

That worked like a champ, with a few gotchas:

  • I would receive a 400 Bad Request if I sent an image that was too large. 1024 x 768 worked, but 2000 x 2000 didn’t. The documentation says the image must be less than 4MB, and at least 50×50.
  • That API endpoint must be initialized. Examples don’t always make this clear. There’s no constructor that takes an endpoint address, so it’s easy to miss.
  • It can take a moment for recognition to occur. Make sure you’re using async/await so you don’t block the UI Thread!

Prettying It Up

Before I get into the results, I wanted to point out I spent significant time prettying things up. I added animations, different font sizes, better icons from The Noun Project, and more. While the image recognizer only took about an hour, the UX took a lot more. Funny how that works.

Mixed Results

So I was getting results. I added a few labels to my view to see what was coming back. Some of them were funny, others were accurate. The tags were expected, but the captions were fascinating. The captions describe the scene as the Computer Vision API sees it. I spent most of the day taking photos and seeing what was returned. Some examples:

  • My barista, Matt, was “a smiling woman working in a store”
  • My mom was “a smiling man” – she was not amused

Most of the time, as long as the subjects were clear, the scene recognition was correct:

Screenshot_20181105-080807

Or close to correct, in this shot with a turtle at Petsmart:

tmp_1541385064684

Sometimes, though, nothing useful would be returned:

Screenshot_20181105-080727

I would have thought it would have found “White Castle”. I wonder if it won’t show brand names for some reason? They do have an OCR endpoint, so maybe that would be useful in another use case.

Sometimes, even though I thought an image would “obviously” be recognized, it wasn’t:

Screenshot_20181105-081207

I’ll need to read more about how to improve accuracy, if and whether that’s even an option.

Good thing I implemented it with an interface! I could try Google’s computer vision services next.

Next Steps

We’re not done with the app yet – this week, we will discuss how to handle the scoring. I’ll post updates as we work on it. Here’s a link to the iOS beta.

Some things I’d like to try:

  • Highlight the tags in the image, by drawing over the image. I’d make this a toggle.
  • Clean up the UI to toggle “developer details”. It’s cool to show those now, but it doesn’t necessarily help the target user. I’ll ask my mentee what he thinks.

Please let me know if you have any questions by leaving a comment!

Want to learn more about Xamarin? I suggest Microsoft’s totally awesome Xamarin University. All the classes you need to get started are free.

Update 2018-11-06:

  • The tags are in two different locations – Tags and Description.Tags. Two different sets of tags are in there, so I’m now combining those lists and getting better results.
  • I found I could get color details. I’ve updated the accent color surrounding the photo. Just a nice design touch.

I ran into this issue this week. I would define the Source as a URL and then, nothing…

It turns out, with FFImageLoading, an indispensable Xamarin.Forms plugin available via NuGet, you must also set the ErrorPlaceholder property if loading your image from a URL. That did the trick – images started loading perfectly!

I’ve reported what I think is a bug. I haven’t yet looked at their code.

Here’s an example of how I fixed it:

Working Code:

<ff:CachedImage 
    Source="{Binding ModelImageUrl}"
    ErrorPlaceholder="icon_errorloadingimage"
    DownsampleToViewSize="True"
    RetryCount="3"
    RetryDelay="1000"
    WidthRequest="320"
    HeightRequest="240"
    Aspect="AspectFit"
    HorizontalOptions="Center" 
    VerticalOptions="Center" />

Non-Working Code, note the missing ErrorPlaceholder property:

<ff:CachedImage 
    Source="{Binding ModelImageUrl}"
    DownsampleToViewSize="True"
    RetryCount="3"
    RetryDelay="1000"
    WidthRequest="320"
    HeightRequest="240"
    Aspect="AspectFit"
    HorizontalOptions="Center" 
    VerticalOptions="Center" />

I hope that helps others with the same issue. Enjoy!

As part of my .NET 301 Advanced class at the fantastic Eleven Fifty Academy, I teach Xamarin development. It’s sometimes tough, as every student has a different machine. Some have PCs, others have Macs running Parallels or Bootcamp. Some – many – have Intel processors, while others have AMD. I try to recommend students come to the class with Intel processors, due to the accelerated Android emulator benefit Intel’s HAXM – Hardware Acceleration Manager – provides. This blog entry is a running list of how I’ve solved getting the emulator running on so many machines. I hope the list helps you, too.

This list will be updated from time to time, as I find new bypasses. At this time, the list is targeted primarily for machines with an Intel processor. Those with AMD and Windows are likely stuck with the ARM emulators. Umm, sorry. I welcome solutions, there, too, please!

Last updated: December 4, 2017

Make sure you’re building from a path that’s ultimate length is less than 248 characters.

That odd Windows problem of long file paths bites us again here. Many new developers tend to build under c:\users\username\documents\Visual Studio 2017\projectname. Add to that the name of the project, and all its subfolders, and the eventual DLLs and executable are out of reach of various processes.

I suggest in this case you have a folder such as c:\dev\ and build your projects under there. That’s solved many launch and compile issues.

Use the x86 emulators.

If you have an Intel processor, then use the x86 and x64 based emulators instead of ARM. They’re considerably faster, as long as you have a) an Intel processor with virtualization abilities, which I believe all or most modern Intel processors do, and b) Intel’s HAXM installed.

Make sure VTI-X / Hardware Virtualization is enabled.

Intel’s HAXM – which you can download here – won’t run if the processor’s virtualization is disabled. You need to tackle this in the BIOS. That varies per machine. Many devices seem to chip with the feature disabled. Enabling it will enable HAXM to work.

Uninstall the Mobile Development with .NET Workload using the Visual Studio Installer, and reinstall.

Yes, I’m suggesting Uninstall + Reinstall. This has worked well in the class. Go to Start, then Visual Studio Installer, and uncheck the box. Restart afterwards. Then reinstall, and restart.

Mobile Development Workload Screenshot

Use the Xamarin Android SDK Manager.

The Xamarin team has built a much better Android SDK Manager than Google’s. It’s easy to install HAXM, update Build Tools and Platforms, and so forth. Use it instead and dealing with tool version conflicts may be a thing of the past.

Make sure you’re using the latest version of Visual Studio.

Bugs are fixed all the time, especially with Xamarin. Make sure you’re running the latest bits and your problems may be solved.

Experiment with Hyper-V Enabled and Disabled.

I’ve generally had issues with virtualization when Hyper-V is enabled. If you’re having trouble with it enabled, try with it disabled.

To enable/disable Hyper-V, go to Start, then type Windows Features. Choose Turn Windows Features On or Off. When the selection list comes up, toggle the Hyper-V feature accordingly.

Note: You may need to disable Windows Device Guard before you can disable Hyper-V. Thanks to Matt Soucoup for this tip.

Use a real device.

As a mobile developer, you should never trust the emulators to reflect the real thing. If you can’t get the emulators to work, and even if you can, you have the option of picking up an Android phone or tablet for cheap. Get one and test with it. If you’re not clear on how to set up Developer Mode on Android devices, it’s pretty simple. Check out Google’s article on the subject.

Try Xamarin’s HAXM and emulator troubleshooting guide.

The Xamarin folks have a guide, too.

If all else fails, use the ARM processors.

This is your last resort. If you don’t have an Intel processor, or a real device available, use the ARM processors. They’re insanely slow. I’ve heard there’s an x86 emulator from AMD, yet it’s supposedly only available for Linux. Not sure why that decision was made, but moving on… 🙂

Have another solution?

Have a suggestion, solution, or feature I’ve left out? Let me know and I’ll update!

 

My latest Visual Studio extension is now available! Get it here: 2017, 2015

So what is CodeLink?

Getting two developers on the same page over chat can be time consuming. I work remote, so I can’t just walk to someone’s desk. I often find myself saying “go to this file” and “ok, now find function <name>”. Then I wait. Most of the time it’s only 10-20 seconds lost. If it’s a common filename or function, it takes longer. Even then, mistakes can be made.

So I asked myself: Self, wouldn’t it be great if I could send them a link to the place / cursor location in the solution I’m at? Just like a web link?

CodeLink was born.

So here’s what a CodeLink looks like:

codelink://[visualstudio]/[AurisIdeas.Common.Security\AurisIdeas.Common.Security.csproj]/[ParameterFactory.cs]/[9]

I would simply share that CodeLink with a fellow developer. They’d select “Open CodeLink…” in VisualStudio, paste it in, and be brought to that line of code in that project. No more walking them through it, much less waiting.

Technically, the format is:

codelink://[Platform]/[Project Unique Path]/[File Unique Path]/[LineNumber]

What’s it good for?

Other than what I’ve suggested, and what you come up with, I’m thinking CodeLink will help you, teams, teachers, and students with:

  • Include CodeLinks in bugs, code reviews to highlight what needs to be reviewed
  • Share CodeLinks on Git repos, pointing to specific code examples, points of interest, and so forth
  • Share CodeLinks with students so they can continue referring / reviewing useful code

So what’s next?

When I was thinking of the link format, I figured I may end up extending this to VS Code and other editors in the future. After all, not everyone uses VS. Why not XCode, Visual Studio Mac, Atom? So, I added a type identifier.

As always, I look forward to your feedback. Hit me up on Twitter or LinkedIn.

 

I recently deployed an Azure Cloud Service with Remote Desktop enabled. However, when I went to connect to it on port 3389, the server refused the connection. I remember there was something I had to do, but I had never written down the steps. So, here’s what you need to do, in case you’re looking 🙂

Note: I use Remote Desktop Connection Manager, a.k.a. RDCMan, also from Microsoft, instead of the standard RDC client. I feel it’s much better, more configurable, and great if you need to work with many remote desktops. I’ve love to know why they don’t include it in Windows!

Step 1: Find your Cloud Service and Slot in Azure Portal

In Azure, find your Cloud Service. Also select the slot to which you want to connect, such as Production or Staging.

Step 2: Select the Roles and Instances option

You’ll see it on the left.

Step 3: Choose the item to which you want to connect and click Connect

For example, your web role instance. This will download an .RDP file. You can double-click this file to connect. Ooh! Neat!

Step 4: If you’re using RDCMan…

To connect with RDCMan, you’ll need to grab the Cookie: something something something string out of the RDP file. Open it in Notepad++, or your text editor of choice, and grab that value. Ignore the s: text.

In RDCMan, for the VM, add the string under Connection Settings tab in the Load balance config textbox.

Step 5: You’re Connected!

Enjoy!

 

 

Have you been wondering how to access the Azure Multi-Factor Authentication Settings in the Azure Classic Portal without first having to create an Azure account? I figured this out a few days ago, having an Office 365 tenant, and wanting to use the EMS and Azure Active Directory Premium features. Following Microsoft’s instructions, it said to go to the Azure Classic Portal. The problem is, Office 365 doesn’t include an Azure subscription, it just includes Azure Active Directory, which you manage through the “modern” Azure portal. Unfortunately, the Trusted IPs and MFA capabilities are managed through the Azure Classic Portal, which you can’t directly access without an Azure subscription.

So, here’s what you do:

  1. Go to portal.office.com
  2. Click Admin to open the admin tools
  3. In the search box, type MFA
  4. Select the Multi-factor authentication search result
  5. Click the link to open the Manage multi-factor authentication link
  6. There you go – manage MFA in your Azure AD to your heart’s content!

 

Want to learn all about Xamarin and how you can use it, while not spending most of your time watching code scroll by in a video? I figured there was room for an explainer without being a close-captioner for a code tutorial. Enjoy my latest video!

https://www.youtube.com/edit?video_id=AhvofyQCrhw

From the description, along with links:

Have you been considering Xamarin for your cross-platform mobile app? This presentation will help.

In this non-code-heavy presentation, we’ll discuss:

* What is Xamarin
* Development Environment Gotchas
* Creating a Sample To Do List App without writing any code
* Reviewing a real Xamarin app that’s “in the wild”
* Review native, platform-specific integrations
* Discuss gotchas when using Xamarin, and mobile apps in general
* Answer audience questions

Why not code-heavy? Because there are many examples you can follow online. This presentation will provide valuable information you can consider while reviewing the myriad of tutorials available to you with a simple Bing or Google search, or visiting Pluralsight, Microsoft Virtual Academy, or Xamarin University.

If you have any feedback, please leave in the comments, or ask me on Twitter: @Auri

Here are the links relevant for this presentation:

Slides: https://1drv.ms/p/s!AmKBMqPeeM_1-Zd7Y…

Indy.Code Slides with Cost and Performance Figures: https://1drv.ms/p/s!AmKBMqPeeM_1-JZR4…
(you can find the Indy.Code() presentation on my YouTube channel)

Google Xamarin vs. Native iOS with Swift/Objective C vs. Android with Java Performance Article: https://medium.com/@harrycheung/mobil…

Example code for push notifications, OAuth Twitter/Facebook/Google authentication, and more: https://github.com/codemillmatt/confe…

Link to Microsoft Dev Essentials for $30/month free Azure credit and free Xamarin training: https://aka.ms/devessentials

Microsoft Virtual Academy Multi-Threading Series: https://mva.microsoft.com/en-us/train…